Deep simplistic thoughts

The perfect Zelda game would have almost no story, very little dialog, and would start you in an area with very little explanation or direction.

Presented with four directions to go in, you would literally be in charge of Link’s destiny, for better of worse. None of those directions would feature extraneous, pace-slowing cutscenes.

You would begin this simplistic quest without a sword.

17 Responses to Deep simplistic thoughts

  1. Sean (Logged out!) says:

    So you mean, The NES Zelda is the perfect Zelda game? I agree.

  2. deepthought says:

    i like zelda. but i also like progress in presentation and storytelling.

  3. mrredstuff says:

    so what.. if the madevthe orignial zelda but in 3d super graphics and etc, itd be the perfect zelda?

  4. mrredstuff says:

    **** if they made the original zelda

    is what i meant,

  5. gojiguy says:

    Very little explanation or direction? So basically the two reasons I hate the series and cannot finish a single game? Yeah, sounds great.

    Actually it would be great if they could pull it off without making only one solution to a problem. Having a bit more of a sandbox style game.

    I always found that it would seem like there could be several ways to clear a dungeon but in reality it was just one and that was just frustrating.

    The challenge in Zelda is not the difficulty of the puzzles, the enemies, or the bosses. It’s simply trying to understand what you are supposed to do.

  6. Gary says:

    I don’t know why you have a preference for video games with almost no story, but a Zelda title with little or no story would be a huge step backwards. I don’t mind that I’m just trying to save the princess in every Mario game, but I need more motivation to tackle a huge Zelda adventure. If you like games with little or no story, play your NES. But this is 2009, so story is a big requirement for a lot of gamers.

    As for cutscenes, when done properly, they add to the experience instead of take away from it.

  7. finland says:

    This horrid idea was basically taken from Malstrom. No thanks.

  8. peshue says:

    Little to no direction is tough to pull off well. I don’t think the first Zelda did it very well. It would be interesting to see a new game closer to that style though.

  9. GerudoKing says:

    So, pretty much Majora’s Mask except a tad less background, no Tatl to constantly tell you which direction to go to, and with all directions able to be entered with your current equipment? That would be a very original idea! (sarcasm, if you can’t tell)

  10. Poochy says:

    Someone’s been reading too many Malstrom articles..

  11. Mark says:

    I’m surprised how much hostility there is to the idea of focusing on the exploration aspect of a game that’s supposed to be about exploration. What made Zelda different from other games of its time was its non-linearity and the player’s ability to do and explore whatever they want at their own pace. That was what made Zelda, Zelda. The way the series is going now its just turning into another story driven action game, which isn’t necessarily bad, but it abandons part of what made Zelda original in the first place. While I don’t mind story being in video games, the fact that it took three hours of doing decidedly non-Zelda things (wrangling goats, rescuing babies, and finding lost kittens) to reach the actual Zelda part of the Zelda game (namely the dungeons and the sword fighting and the puzzles). Too much story can be a bad thing for any video game. Sometimes simple is best (Punch-Out!!, NSMBW, World of Goo, Megaman, etc.). The developers need to stop worrying so much about plot and side-quests and mini-games and focus more on the important things. Exploration. Sword-fighting. Puzzle solving. Dungeon conquering. That’s what Zelda’s about, and that’s all it need.

  12. Phil Myth says:

    … I’m sure I’ve played this game…

    I think Sean has as well….

  13. HyperPhazon says:

    @ Phil Myth

    Pardon me if this is an “in joke” of some sort, but may I ask as to which game you are referring to?

  14. Jack says:

    @Mark: Surprised? The hostility here is from the same group of clowns it always comes from. More like “predictable” 🙂

  15. kevinczap says:

    This sums up Miyamoto’s original intent with the game – to make you really feel like you are on an adventure, exploring a new world. You start out with nothing and through your own resolve and creativity, you become a hero.

    So I agree this would make the perfect Zelda game, because that’s exactly what the game was created to do. If this doesn’t sound like a game you would want to play, there are many other kinds of games.

  16. Jeff says:

    Correct me if I’m wrong, but don’t you start most Zelda games without a sword?

    In fact the only games to egregiously violate this steadfast Malstrom-approved rule are Majora’s Mask and *GASP* Zelda II, one of the classics Malstrom enjoys to no end.

    I think that, while Malstrom does have a lot of good things to say about the game industry in general, he typically shows a GREAT DEAL of ignorance when it comes to discussing individual series, and this is the case with his roll-back-the-clock attitude for Zelda. (Of course he’ll overlook the total LORE DUMP that was Link to the Past. That game had a gigantic bloated intro about seven sages that had zero to do with the game. Nostalgia can be like alcohol I suppose. Makes people forget.)

    Jack, you’re a smart enough guy. You don’t need to parrot everything malstrom says and this is clearly a time you shouldn’t. Malstrom’s off his rocker about Zelda and the sales numbers from the series prove it. Malstrom is done in by his own philosophy, at least on this point.

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